Blog :: 09-2012

Big music shows in Asheville area

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9/28/2012 - Big music shows in Asheville area
by Asheville Citizen Times

Coming up

Jethro Tull's Ian Anderson performing "Thick as a Brick," parts one and two, 8 p.m. today, Thomas Wolfe Auditorium at U.S. Cellular Center, Haywood Street, Asheville. $35, $47.50, $72.50 and service charges at www.ticketmaster.com.

Joe Rogan, 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Thomas Wolfe Auditorium. $30.50. www.ticketmaster.com.

The Fresh Beat Band, 5 p.m. Oct. 7, Thomas Wolfe Auditorium. $37. www.ticketmaster.com.

Bonnie Raitt, 8 p.m. Oct. 9, Thomas Wolfe Auditorium. $53. www.ticketmaster.com.

Bruce Hornsby, 7:30 p.m. Oct. 13, Harrah's Cherokee Event Center. 800-745-3000 or www.ticketmaster.com.

John Prine, 8 p.m. Oct. 20, Thomas Wolfe Auditorium. $50.50 at Ticketmaster.com

Justice, 8 p.m. Oct. 25, U.S. Cellular Center. $37 plus fees.

Moogfest 2012 with Nas, Primus 3D, Orbital, Miike Snow, Santigold, Richie Hawtin, Thomas Dolby, many more, Oct. 26-27, U.S. Cellular Center's Thomas Wolfe Auditorium, Orange Peel, Asheville Music Hall and other venues. Tickets on sale at moogfest.com.

Lil Jon, 10 p.m. Oct. 27, Harrah's Cherokee Event Center. DJ Stephanie Loayza opens the show. www.ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000

The Who, "Quadrophenia and More," 7:30 p.m. Nov. 8, Bi-Lo Center, Greenville, S.C. $39.50, $81.50, $129.50. www.ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000.

Straight No Chaser, 9 p.m. Nov. 9, Harrah's Cherokee Event Center, www.ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000.

Celtic Woman, 9 p.m. April 26, 2013, Harrah's Cherokee Event Center. 800-745-3000 or www.ticketmaster.com.

To submit entries for this calendar, send information to Carole Terrell at cterrell@citizen-times.com t two weeks in advance.

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Asheville-area theater productions

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9/28/2012 - Asheville-area theater productions
by Asheville Citizen Times

A new musical at The Magnetic Field (its title is so edgy we can only mention it online) runs through Oct. 13, Magnetic Field, 372 Depot St., Asheville. Tracey Johnston Crum stars as a woman being romanced by a young neighbor. Well-written and played. Grade A-minus. Performances at 7:30 p.m. Thusday-Saturday. $13 on Thursdays, $16 on Friday/Saturdays. 257-4003. See ashevillescene.com for details, or www.themagneticfield.com.

"No She Didn't ... Good Girls Gone Bad and the Dances That Happen," 10 p.m. today-Saturday, Magnetic Field, 372 Depot St. Comedy/burlesque show. $17 in advance, $20 at the door.

"Hairspray" to Oct. 14, Asheville Community Theatre, 35 E. Walnut St. Jerry Crouch directs this big musical comedy about a teen girl who dreams of dancing on an "American Bandstand"-like TV show. Performances at 7:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2:30 p.m. Sunday. 254-1320 or www.ashevilletheatre.org.

"R. Buckminster Fuller: The History (and Mystery) Of the Universe," to Oct. 7, N.C. Stage Company, 15 Stage Lane, Asheville. 7:30 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday and Sept. 30, 2 p.m. Sundays. $16-$28 depending on day of the week. Grade A-minus. 239-0263. www.ncstage.org

"Between the Tackles," to Oct. 5, Parkway Playhouse, 202 Green Mountain Drive, Burnsville. Three lifelong fans get together for an important football game in this comedy by Britt Kaufmann and Stephanie Stark Poling. 682-4285. www.parkwayplayhouse.com

"A Tribute to the Jersey Boys: Franki Valli and the Four Seasons," 8 p.m. today-Sunday, as part of the Music on the Rock Series, Flat Rock Playhouse Downtown, 125 S. Main St., Hendersonville. $24. 693-0731. www.flatrockplayhouse.org.

"Pump Boys and Dinettes," 7:30 p.m. today, 3 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Hoey Auditorium at Western Carolina University, N.C. 107, Cullowhee. $20, $15 seniors and WCU faculty/staff, $10 students. 227-2479 or bardoartscenter.wcu.edu.

"The Giver," 7:30 p.m. today-Sunday, 2 p.m. Saturday-Sunday, UNC Asheville's Carol Belk Theatre. $10, $5 students. http://drama.unca.edu/theatre-unca or 232-6610.

"Light Up the Sky," 2:30 p.m. today-Saturday, 35below, Walnut Street, downtown Asheville, and Sunday at UNC Asheville's Reuter Center. 1948 comedy by The Autumn Players of Asheville Community Theatre. Dramatic readings by experienced performers. $5 cash at the door. 254-1320 or www.ashevilletheatre.org.

"The Music of Eric Clapton: Unplugged," 8 p.m. Oct. 2-5, as part of the Music on the Rock Series, Flat Rock Playhouse Downtown, 125 S. Main St., Hendersonville. $24. 693-0731. www.flatrockplayhouse.org.

Synergy Story Slam, Asheville's only open-mic, community-based storytelling event. Sign-ups begin at 7 p.m. Stories start at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 2. $5-10 sliding scale donation at the door. www.facebook.com/pages/Synergy-Story-Slam/110545309018699.

"Zelda -- An American Love Story," Oct. 3-28, Flat Rock Playhouse, 2661 Greenville Highway, Flat Rock. Jazz-age musical loosely based on the lives of Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald. Performances at 8 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday and 2 p.m. most Wednesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays and Sundays. $40, $30 students. 693-0731.

"The Light in the Piazza," weekends Oct. 5-21, Performing Arts Center, 250 Pigeon St., Waynesville. Set in the 1950s, there is love in the air in this story of a woman and a daughter from Winston-Salem on vacation in Florence, Italy. $24, seniors $22, students $10. 456-6322. http://harttheater.com/.

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Asheville adventure of the week: Nantahala Festival

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9/27/2012 - Asheville adventure of the week: Nantahala Festival
by Karen Chavez - Asheville Citizen Times

What: Nantahala Outdoor Center's Guest Appreciation Festival.

When: Friday-Sunday.

Where: Nantahala Outdoor Center, U.S. 19 west, Wesser, Swain County, about 13 miles west of Bryson City.

Details: If you're looking for a good end-of-summer deal on a canoe or kayak, or just want to get back in the river one last time, this weekend at the Nantahala Outdoor Center has your number.

NOC will hold its end-of-season Guest Appreciation Festival, also known as "GAF." One of the Southeast's largest outdoor lifestyle events, GAF is anchored by a massive used-gear sale where NOC liquidates its gear and equipment used throughout the summer season, resulting in big-time bargains.

Besides NOC's used-gear sale, there will be a used-gear marketplace for buying and selling your own used outdoor gear, and NOC's riverside Outfitter's Store will have sales on new fall season gear and apparel. Dozens of manufacturer representatives will discuss product features and answer questions.

But this isn't all about shopping. The festival will be a big outdoor party with free entertainment. Kids will enjoy the challenge of an outdoor climbing wall, special event-only access to NOC's Zip Line Adventure Park, a live raptor show, professional storytelling, bounce houses, games and face-painting.

For the older crowd, there will be acrobatic bike trials exhibitions, a head-to-head "boater cross" race, a freestyle kayaking competition and a slalom kayak race. NOC will host a wilderness survival skills clinics, an on-the-water surf school hosted by NOC's Paddling School and a mountain biking pump track.

There will be beer tasting Friday night and live music Friday and Saturday at NOC's riverside café and bar, including the Freight Hoppers, jazz from the Vertigo Jazz Project, alternative bluegrass from the Packway Handle Band, rock from the Archrivals and funk from The Secret B-Sides.

You'll probably get wet, so everyone is encouraged to bring a change of clothes.

Directions: From Asheville, take Interstate 40 west to Exit 27. Continue west on U.S. 74 west toward Bryson City. Once the highway turns to a two-lane in the Nantahala Gorge, the NOC campus is a few miles on the right. It is just over an hour's drive.

Information: Call 866-535-5743 or visit www.noc.com/GAF.

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30th annual Asheville Quilt Show this weekend

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9/26/2012 - 30th annual Asheville Quilt Show this weekend
by Barbara Blake - Asheville Citizen Times

 ASHEVILLE -- In case you thought quilting was an old-fashioned and utilitarian handicraft designed to keep humble country folk warm in their rustic beds, consider this:

 In addition to completing a lovely quilt that was started by her great-grandmother in the late 1800s, quilting guru Georgia Bonesteel, of Flat Rock, has also created a wall hanging that is in fact a QR code that will take you to her website when it's zapped by a smart phone or iPad.

So much for antiquated stitchery.

Bonesteel's generations-spanning offerings will join nearly 300 others at the Asheville Quilt Guild's 30th annual Asheville Quilt Show, happening Friday-Sunday in the Expo Center at the Western North Carolina Agricultural Center.

The show, with the theme "Color your life ... with quilts," is an eagerly awaited annual adventure for quilters as well as art lovers, who can peruse the maze of aisles to gape in awe at craftsmanship and creativity of epic proportions.

Quilters from 12 states will display works of all shapes, sizes and designs -- although only one doubles as a digital electronic code. There will be more than 20 vendors, ongoing demonstrations, a silent auction and gift shop, and a special presentation by certified quilt appraiser Connie Brown at 1:30 p.m. Sunday.

Katie Winchell, co-chair of the show with her husband, Roger, said the quilt show has gotten "bigger and better" in the 30 years since its debut with 35 quilts hung in a building in an alley off Lexington Avenue.

"We have 100 more quilts this year than last year -- we're not sure what to make of it," Winchell said.

"Our show is actually considered to be sort of a test show -- if it does well here, they'll take their quilts to the big national shows. And that makes us feel wonderful -- like our show is something not to be missed."

The show has outgrown a number of homes over the years, from that alley off Lexington to the old Ivey's and J.C. Penney buildings downtown, the Mayflower Building off College Street, the Carolina Day School gym and the N.C. Arboretum before finally settling at the Ag Center last year.

Barbara Swinea, who has been involved in every show since its inception, said the number of quilters has increased vastly over three decades. "The quilting industry worldwide is a multimillion-dollar industry; fabric stores are thriving, sewing machines are being sold, fabric is being produced all over the world -- it's huge," she said.

"There are still many old-fashioned, traditional quilts being made, but quilting has also become more of an art form," Swinea said.

Bonesteel's quilts are a prime example. As the host of UNC-TV's "Lap Quilting With Georgia Bonesteel" for 33 years, she's a master at traditional quilting.

But she's also got a penchant for contemporary whimsy -- thus the QR code wall hanging that will be a gift for her son, filmmaker Paul Bonesteel, with whom she made the 2005 documentary "The Great American Quilt Revival."

"When I began to see these bar-code type squares in magazines and seemingly everywhere, I identified them as patchwork," Bonesteel said. "My wonder was, could I re-create them in fabric, and would they read with an iPad or iPhone?"

She spent days making her first one, with her own website as the target. Finally, she clicked on her iPad, and nothing happened.

"A quilter in the class I was teaching studied my original on paper and noted two rows were wrong," she said. "It took another day to rip out and make it right, and when I clicked with the iPad it took me promptly to my website, proving that it does work -- yeah!"

And then there is "Lottie's Quilt," which began with the quilt top she inherited from her great grandmother, Lottie Sayler, and ended when Bonesteel completed it 115 years later.

"We respect and learn from the past, as in Lottie's quilt, but we love to find new patchwork challenges and ideas, as in the QR reader," she said.

Bonesteel carried Lottie's quilt around for three years, "and I know many of my friends will declare, 'Finally, she got it done!'" Bonesteel said. "I found that it was an emotional process, taking me back to the many stories my mother told about her grandmother."

Among them are tales of Lottie being the town seamstress and wedding-dress-maker, and the first woman in her county to own and drive a car; before that, she delivered her eggs on a horse with the milk hanging on the saddlebags. "When she got home, she had butter," Bonesteel said.

"I kept a journal the whole time I worked on the quilt, and this diary will go with the quilt to our first great-grandchild," she said. "I think the fact that a quilt top can span the generations is a very special thing."

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Arts and Entertainment Events

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9/25/2012 - Arts and Entertainment Events
by Asheville Citizen Times

ACOUSTIC

Youngs Mountain Music, 8-10 bands featuring mountain music 7-11 p.m. every Saturday, Mountain Music Drive (off U.S. 19E), Burnsville. Non-alcoholic facility. 675-4790.

Sarah McQuaid, 7 p.m. today, Mountain Spirit Coffeehouse at Unitarian Universalist Congregation, 1 Edwin Place, Asheville. $15, $10 students, free age 13 and younger. 299-4171 or www.uuasheville.org.

The Jason Bishop Show, 7:30 p.m. Oct. 7, Western Carolina University, John W. Bardo Fine and Performing Arts Center, Cullowhee. Bishop is known for his "double levitation" illusion. $20, $15 WCU faculty and staff, $5 students and children. 227-2479 or bardoartscenter.wcu.edu.

Jeremy Kittel Band, 8 p.m. Oct. 12, Diana Wortham Theatre at Pack Place, 2 S. Pack Sq., Asheville. $30, $25 students, $15 children. 257-4530 or www.dwtheatre.com.

Nashville Bluegrass Band, 8 p.m. Oct. 20, Performing Arts Center, 507 Chestnut St., Highlands. 526-9047 or www.highlandspac.org.

Janis Ian and Tom Paxton: Together At Last, 8 p.m. Oct. 20, Diana Wortham Theatre at Pack Place, 2 S. Pack Sq., Asheville. $30, $25 students, $15 children. 257-4530 or www.dwtheatre.com.

Ronny Cox with his trio, 7 p.m. Oct. 21, Mountain Spirit Coffeehouse at Unitarian Universalist Congregation, 1 Edwin Place, Asheville. $15, $10 students, free age 13 and younger. 299-4171 or www.uuasheville.org.

Pianist Julie Bees, 7:30 p.m. Oct. 23, Blue Ridge Community College, Flat Rock. $10, $3 students, $50 season tickets. 694-1743.

Guitar recital, 7:30 p.m. Nov. 13, Blue Ridge Community College, Flat Rock. UNC School of the Arts students. $10, $3 students. 694-1743.

Lorraine Conard Christmas concert, 3 p.m. Nov. 18, Haywood County Public Library, 678 S. Haywood St., Waynesville. Free.

Flute recital, 7:30 p.m. Jan. 15, 2013, Blue Ridge Community College, Flat Rock. UNC School of the Arts students. $10, $3 students. 694-1743.

Gershwin music, 7:30 p.m. Feb. 19, Blue Ridge Community College, Flat Rock. $10, $3 students. 694-1743.

Pianist Kirill Gliadkovsky, 7:30 p.m. March 19, Blue Ridge Community College, Flat Rock. $10, $3 students. 694-1743.

CHRISTIAN AND GOSPEL

Hominy Valley Fall Coloring Singing, 2 p.m. Oct. 13-14 and 20-21, featuring The Primitive Quartet and others. Hominy Valley Singing Grounds, N.C. 151, Candler. $14, free ages 12 and younger. http://primitivequartet.com/upload/specialevents.htm.

CLASSICAL AND CHORAL

AmiciMusic presents "The Poetry of Beethoven," dinner 6:30 p.m., concert 8 p.m. Sept. 29, White Horse, 105C Montreat Road, Black Mountain. $30. For show only, $20, $10 ages 17 and younger. 669-0816 or www.whitehorseblackmountain.com.

First Mondays Concert Series, Dilshad Posnock (flute), Eric Ohlsson (oboe), Deloise Lima (piano), 12:30 p.m. Oct. 1, Brevard Music Center. Free. 862-2120.

Asheville Symphony, Brahms Piano Concerto No. 2 with Valentina Lisitsa, 8 p.m. Oct. 13, Thomas Wolfe Auditorium at U.S. Cellular Center, Haywood Street. www.ashevillesymphony.org.

Asheville Symphony, Rachmaninoff's Paganini Variations with Van Cliburn medalist Joyce Yang, 8 p.m. Nov. 17, Thomas Wolfe Auditorium. www.ashevillesymphony.org.

DANCE

Una Noche de Flamenco: Guitar, Song and Dance, 7 p.m. Friday, BeBe Theatre, 20 Commerce St., Asheville. $25. 254-2621.

Moscow Ballet's Great Russian Nutcracker, 3 and 7:30 p.m. Nov. 24, Harrah's Cherokee Event Center. For tickets, visit www.ticketmaster.com or call 800-745-3000. Patrons under age 21 will be able to attend.

"The Nutcracker" by Ballet Spartanburg, 7 p.m. Dec. 7, 3 p.m. Dec. 8-9, Converse College's Twitchell Auditorium, 580 E. Main St., Spartanburg, S.C. $32, $26 seniors, $20 students. Call 864-596-9725.

Clogging and Irish step dancing, every Monday at Joyful Noise in Weaverville. $10 per class. A variety of classes starting between 5-7:30 p.m. Contact Cheryl Renfro at 712-7559 or cherylrenfro@hotmail.com.

Tango, milonga at Tomato Cocina Latina, 70 Westgate Pky., Asheville, 8:30 p.m.-midnight second and fourth Fridays. Presented by Tango Asheville. $5 members, $6 non-members.

Hip Hop for kids, 5 p.m. Fridays, Hunab Kru Studio of Dance, Arden. For age 6-13. The art of BBoying and BGirling to all skill levels. 654-7890.

Square and round dancing, with Land of Sky Square Dance Club, second and fourth Fridays, Senior Opportunity Center, 36 Grove St., Asheville. For all ages. www.landofskyquares.info.

West African dance classes, 7:30-8:30 p.m. Tuesdays, Terpsicorps Studio, Old Lyman Street, Asheville. Classes are done to live drumming. $10. Open to all levels. 319-2486.

Tuesday Night Dance Social, 7-8:30 p.m. Tuesdays, Homewood Event and Conference Center, 19 Zillicoa St., Asheville. $7. Music provided includes ballroom, country western, line dance, swing, salsa, more. 712-8121.

Square dance lessons with Southern Lights Square and Round Dance Club, 7:30 p.m. Wednesdays, Stoney Mountain Activity Center, Stoney Mountain Road, Hendersonville. 625-9969.

Contra dance, 2-4:30 p.m. every fourth Sunday, The Gateway Club, 37 Church St., Waynesville. $5. 456-6789.

Classes With Ellie Grace, Appalachian clogging and Cape Breton step dancing, West Asheville. 573-239-0430 or www.gracefamilymusic.com.

Irish dance classes, ongoing classes at Miss Donna's Academy of Dance in Candler. For all levels. 242-2361.

FILM SCREENINGS

World Cinema Series, 8 p.m. every Friday, The Courtyard Gallery at the Phil Mechanic Building, 109 Roberts St., Asheville.

Movies at Jackson County Library in Sylva are shown 6:30 p.m. every Thursday. Free. Call 586-2016 for schedule.

Asheville Qfest, Oct. 11-14, Fine Arts Theatre, Biltmore Avenue, Asheville. Asheville's only LGBTQ international film festival.

Environmental Film Festival, 6:30 p.m. Oct. 12-13, Hendersonville Little Theater, 229 S. Washington St. Films that focus on biodiversity and conservation and the chemical burdens our bodies are exposed to. Festival opens with "What Would Darwin Think?: Man vs. Nature in the Galapagos." Order tickets at www.eco-wnc.org or 692-0385.

FREE SHOWS

Haywood Community Band, "Americana" 6:30 p.m. Oct. 21, Maggie Valley Pavilion, Soco Road, 456-4880.

Tom Fisch, 3 p.m. Oct. 21, Haywood County Public Library, 678 S. Haywood St., Waynesville. Traditional folk and country music.

Depot Doins, 6:30 p.m. Fridays, downtown Marshall. Bluegrass and country jam open to singers and bands. 645-0503.

Old Fort Mountain Music, 7 p.m. Fridays, year-round, the Rockett Building, Main Street, Old Fort.669-6894.

Woody's Original Mountain Music, 7 p.m. Fridays, year-round, 3354 U.S. 70 W., Marion. 724-4158.

The Lady and the Old Timers Band, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. first Friday of each month, Jackson County Public Library, 310 Keener St., Sylva. Gospel and traditional country tunes. 586-2016.

Bluegrass jam, 6 p.m. every first Saturday, Erwin Hills Lions Club, 188 Erwin Hills Road, Asheville. Several groups perform. Bring your instrument. Cake walk. Free admission. 713-7509.

 

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Asheville-area students, teachers earn honors

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9/24/2012 - Asheville-area students, teachers earn honors
by Asheville Citizen Times

Teitelbaum to appear on Jeopardy Monday

 SYLVA - Dr. Deb Teitelbaum, a North Carolina Center for the Advancement of Teaching fellow, will compete on the TV game show "Jeopardy."

 The former public school teacher will appear as a contestant on "Jeopardy" during the program's broadcast at 7:30 p.m. Monday on WLOS-TV.

Teiltelbaum took personal leave from her faculty position at NCCAT to travel to California in July to compete on the game show.

Based in Cullowhee, the NCCAT educates teachers and provides them with new knowledge, skills, teaching methods, best practices and information to take back to their classrooms. Visit www.nccat.org or call 293-5202.

Waller earns scholarships

ASHEVILLE - Lawrence Waller, a graduate of the Asheville School, is a recipient of the 2012 National Merit Scholarship.

Waller is now attending Vanderbilt University, where was awarded the Cornelius Vanderbilt scholarship, which covers full tuition for four years, plus a stipend for study abroad or research.

Waller is the son of Dorothy Waller, of Asheville, and Lawrence Waller, of Jacksonville, Fla.

Samsel Architects partners with Evergreen, A-B Tech

ASHEVILLE - Charles Krekelberg, of Samsel Architects, recently collaborated with students from Evergreen Community Charter School and Asheville-Buncombe Technical Community College to design and build an outdoor classroom on the school's campus.

Sixth graders from Evergreen were taught how to use computer software to create three-dimensional designs for the outdoor space. The designs were then put into the hands of A-B Tech students, who developed a single hybrid design that reflected the most educationally engaging features from the original designs.

Features of the space include a hempcrete storage shed, expansive gardens and a covered classroom with a cob oven.

Visit Samsel Architect's blog at samselarchitects.com/?blog-entry=educational-collaboration-at-an-asheville-charter-school.

Hunter Auto Group awards scholarships

HENDERSONVILLE - Four high school graduates from the Henderson County Public School district were recently awarded $2,000 each in scholarships sponsored by the Hunter Automotive Group. They are:

o Samit Biren Patel of North Henderson High School. Patel will attend Duke University.

o Ashley Alexandra Heywood of West Henderson High School. She will attend Duke University.

o William Scott Ashcraft of Hendersonville High School. He will attend University of North Dakota.

o Mariah Danielle James of East Henderson High School. She will attend Western Carolina University.

Christ School students recognized as AP Scholars

ARDEN - The Advanced Placement Program of the College Board offers several AP Scholar Awards to recognize high school students who have demonstrated college-level achievement through AP level courses and exams.

Christ School award winners include:

o AP Scholars (score of 3 or better on three or more exams): Nick England, Cooper Henkel, Josh Horwitz, Sam James, Forest Koenigsberg, Frank Lucius, Andy McMillan, Thomas Pritchard, Andres Ripoll Sanchez, Grayson Secor, Tyler Smith, Turner Strayhorn and Jonathan Yung.

o AP Scholars with Honor (average score of at least 3.25 on all exams, scores of 3 or higher on four or more): Spenser Dalton, Blaise Dunsmith, Robbie Mangone and Jim Mouer.

o AP Scholars with Distinction (average score of at least 3.5, scores of 3 or higher on five or more exams): Chambers Loomis and Jesse Richardson-Bull.

Music educators create giant staff

WEAVERVILLE - What can you do with 15 feet of oilcloth, construction paper and black duct tape? Build the world's largest musical staff, of course.

Kathy Bonyun, Buncombe County Schools literacy coach, and Jeannie Graeme, chorus teacher at North Buncombe High, designed an interactive, musical staff floor mat, complete with 4-foot-tall treble and bass clef, to give music students an "off the paper" learning experience.

Borrowing from an earlier project that consisted of creating a large "graph mat" that students could stand on and "become" the point or line in math class, the educators carried the idea over into the arts curriculum.

"Students can either stand on the staff and 'be' the notes themselves or place large notes on the mat based on Ms. Graeme's instructions," said Bonyun, instructional curriculum coach. "It is intended to be a sense-oriented experience for students that goes beyond the usual eight-and-a-half by eleven piece of white paper with black writing.

"It also gives students a visual-spatial perspective on something that has always been stuck on the page. Rather than tiny notes fixed on paper, students can actually pick up life-size notes and measures and walk them to another place."

The grand music staff has also encouraged peer-to-peer teaching opportunities. Students in Graeme's chamber choir came up with activities and games that she could use with less experienced learners in other classes.

According to Principal Jack Evans, "Kathy Bonyun is awesome. This is just the type of thing she works with our teachers to do. This is a way to get students physically active in chorus to improve learning."

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Asheville-made Sandburg film on PBS

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9/24/2012 - Asheville-made Sandburg film on PBS
by Tony Kiss - Asheville Citizen Times

FLAT ROCK -- A documentary about the great poet and author Carl Sandburg by Asheville filmmaker Paul Bonesteel gets a national TV audience tonight, and a local historical site gets a resulting windfall of digital video.

"American Masters: The Day Carl Sandburg Died" plays at 10 p.m. today on PBS and locally on UNC-TV and Asheville's WUNF/Channel 33.

At the same time, the complete, unedited interviews Bonesteel recorded for the documentary are now housed in the Museum Preservation Center at the Carl Sandburg Home National Historic Site, where Bonesteel did considerable filming.

Bonesteel interviewed notables including folk singer Pete Seeger, author Studs Terkel, Sandburg biographer Penelope Niven and radio writer-producer Norman Corwin, among others.

The video interviews, along with transcripts, make a "special addition to the museum," says Connie Backlund, park superintendent, in a statement. The archives will be available to researchers and park staff "for further understanding and appreciation of Carl Sandburg's contributions to the American public," she said.

"Sandburg is such a fascinating and complex person, and as often happens in documentary filmmaking, an amazing amount of materials we gathered for the film was not able to be included in it," Bonesteel said. "I'm thrilled that these interviews are part of the (home's archives) and accessible to people."

A three-time Pulitzer Prize winner -- twice for poetry and once for his biography of Abraham Lincoln -- Sandburg moved in 1945 to Flat Rock to an estate he and his wife, Lilian, continued to call Connemara, a name given the property by a previous owner. Sandburg lived there until his 1967 death age age 89.

His homeplace, across from Flat Rock Playhouse, is now a national historic site, essentially unchanged since the day he died. Admission to the property, which is open daily except Christmas, is free. Tours of the home are available for a small charge.

In "The Day Carl Sandburg Died," Bonesteel looks at Sandburg's politics and anarchist writings during World War II and the increasing interest in his work.

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Asheville area theater productions

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9/21/2012 - Asheville area theater productions
by Asheville Citizen Times

"Hairspray" today-Oct. 14, Asheville Community Theatre, 35 E. Walnut St. Jerry Crouch directs this big musical comedy about a teen girl who dreams of dancing on an "American Bandstand" like TV show. Performances at 7:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2:30 p.m. Sunday. 254-1320.

"R. Buckminster Fuller: The History (and Mystery) Of the Universe," to Oct. 7, N.C. Stage Company, 15 Stage Lane, Asheville. 7:30 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday and Sept. 30, 2 p.m. Sundays. $16-$28 depending on day of the week. Grade A-minus. 239-0263. www.ncstage.org

"The Trip To Bountiful," today-Sunday, Hendersonville Little Theatre, 229 S. Washington St., Hendersonville. The story of Carrie Watts, an aging widow living with her son and daughter-in-law in a three-room flat in Houston. 692-1082. www.hendersonvillelittletheatre.org.

"Almost, Maine," today-Sunday, Flat Rock Playhouse, 2661 Greenville Hwy., Flat Rock. All is not quite what it seems in the remote, mythical town of Almost, Maine. Performances at 8 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday and 2 p.m. most Wednesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays and Sundays. Grade B. $35, $25 students. 693-0731.

"Between the Tackles," Saturday-Oct. 5, Parkway Playhouse, 202 Green Mountain Drive, Burnsville. Lifelong fans get together for an important football game in this comedy by Britt Kaufmann and Stephanie Stark Poling. 682-4285. parkwayplayhouse.com

"A Tribute to the Jersey Boys: Franki Valli and the Four Seasons," 8 p.m. Fridays-Sundays through Sept. 30, as part of the Music on the Rock Series, Flat Rock Playhouse Downtown, 125 S. Main St., Hendersonville. $24. 693-0731. www.flatrockplayhouse.org.

Musical "Pump Boys and Dinettes," 7:30 p.m. Sept. 26-29 plus a 3 p.m. show on Sept. 29, Hoey Auditorium at Western Carolina University, N.C. 107, Cullowhee. $20m $15 seniors and WCU faculty/staff, $10 students. 227-2479 or bardoartscenter.wcu.edu.

"The Giver," 7:30 p.m. Sept. 27-30, 2 p.m. Sept. 29-30, UNC Asheville's Carol Belk Theatre. $10, $5 students. http://drama.unca.edu/theatre-unca or 232-6610.

"Light Up The Sky," 2:30 p.m. Sept. 28-29 at 35below, Walnut Street, downtown Asheville, and Sept. 30 at UNC Asheville's Reuter Center. 1948 comedy by The Autumn Players of Asheville Community Theatre. $5 cash at the door.

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Asheville-area benefit parties, concerts & more

News

News

9/21/2012 - Asheville-area benefit parties, concerts & more
by Asheville Citizen Times

Concert to raise money for 'Messiah'

 WEAVERVILLE - The Weaverville Music Study Club will present "A Tapestry of Sound" at 7 p.m. today at First Baptist Church, 63 N. Main St., as a benefit for a performance of Handel's "Messiah."

 The "Messiah" performance will be at 4 p .m. Dec. 2 at the church.

Musicians for the Sept. 21 program will be violinist Dottie Peeke, accompanied by Frances Coates; harpist Fay Reinhardt; flutist Barbara Scott; and Hannah Pennell, soprano, and Scott Hale, tenor, singing excerpts from "Messiah," accompanied by Linda Jones.

In addition, Dr. Robert G. Boer, director of the December performance, will be introduced and Rev. Wendell Brittain will tell of the beginnings of the Weaverville performances.

An offering will be collected. To learn more, contact Harriet Burnette, 645-5798.

Alzheimer's walk is Saturday

ASHEVILLE - The Alzheimer's Association Walk to End Alzheimer's will be Saturday at Pack Square Park. Registration is at 9 a.m., and the walk starts at 10 a.m.

"There has never been a greater need for the citizens of Asheville to join in the fight against Alzheimer's disease by participating in (the walk)," said Caitlyn Muskat-Thomas, an Alzheimer's Association development manager. "Funds raised will provide care and support services to the 170,000 residents of North Carolina living with Alzheimer's, while also advancing critically-needed research."

To learn more, visit www.alz.org/walk or call 800-272-3900. To learn more about the local chapter of the Alzheimer's Association, call that toll-free number or visit alz.org/northcarolina.

Yard sale to assist transplant hopeful

MILLS SPRING - Volunteers are planning yard sale for 8 a.m. Saturday, in the parking lot of the Mill Spring old baseball field to benefit Michael Conner, a candidate for a kidney transplant.

Conner, 40, has been undergoing regular dialysis since 2009, and is now in total renal failure and awaits a donor match for a transplant. The yard sale will help pay some of the more than $250,000 in expenses he will incur for the operation, and the ongoing expenses thereafter.

To learn more, contact Angie Sisk at kidsforsky@yahoo.com or 712-0011. To make a tax-deductible gift to Conner, visit www.transplants.org or send to the NFT North Carolina Transplant Fund, 5350 Poplar Ave., Suite 430, Memphis, TN 38119. Write "in honor of Michael Conner" on the memo line.

Liberty Corner holds first benefit party

ASHEVILLE - A benefit for Liberty Corner Enterprises will be noon-5 p.m. Saturday in the back stage area of the Lexington Ave. Brewery, 39 N. Lexington Ave.

Admission is $50 and includes live music, beer, wine, soft drinks, a raffle and light appetizers. Scheduled to perform are Maria Lieteau (of Blues Topia Highway), All Strings Considered, Beta Maxx and Lisa Biales. For tickets, call 254-9917.

Liberty Corner Enterprises is a nonprofit that has supported Asheville area people with intellectual or developmental disabilities for 20 years. To learn more, visit libertycornerent.com.

Circus event fights mental illness

ASHEVILLE - The Greatest Show of Courage, a circus-carnival-parade fundraiser to combat the stigma of mental illness, will be noon-4 p.m. Sunday on the stage of Roger McGuire Green at Pack Square.

The event will feature the Runaway Circus, three local bands -- The River Rats, Elijah Hooker and The Zoodles -- food trucks, artists, a silent auction, raffle, cakewalk, games and a parade. (To join or sponsor the parade, visit www.namiwnc.org/circus-parade).

All proceeds benefit the Western Carolina National Alliance on Mental Illness's free education, support and advocacy programs. To learn more, call 505-7353.

Shop to help elephants

MONTREAT - Ten Thousand Villages, 303 Lookout Road, will celebrate Elephant Appreciation Day 1-5 p.m. Sunday with a shopping benefit for The Elephant Sanctuary in Hohenwald, Tenn. The shop will donate 15 percent of all sales that day to sanctuary.

In addition to shopping, enjoy games, light refreshments and webcam feeds from the sanctuary. To learn more, call Belinda Box at 669-1406.

Dine with your dog at Ave. M

ASHEVILLE - Asheville Humane Society will benefit from a Dine With Your Dog event on Sunday. Seatings are at 4 and 6 p.m. on the patio at Avenue M, 791 Merrimon Ave., Asheville.

Cost is $45 per human, including selections from a special menu plus a three-course feast for canine companions .

Call 350-8181 for reservations.To learn more about the humane society and its volunteer opportunities and events, visit www.ashevillehumane.org or call 761-2001.

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Asheville arts leaders informed new National Endowment of the Arts project

News

News

9/20/2012 - Asheville arts leaders informed new National Endowment of the Arts project
by Carol Motsinger - Asheville Citizen Times

Listen closely for mentions of Asheville in the National Endowment of the Arts announcement tomorrow: Our city was one of two in the country selected for "live and online dialogues" to inform the "How Art Works" research report that will be released tomorrow.

You can stream the announcement live from 2-5 p.m. online tomorrow. "How Art Works" will describes the agency's five-year research agenda, framed and informed by a groundbreaking "system map" and measurement model.

According to the press office at the NEA,  "Asheville, NC has a direct connection to the "How Art Works" research report the NEA will release on Thursday.    To help inform the system map in the report, the NEA and the Monitor Institute conducted a series of live and online dialogues with researchers, policymakers, and practitioners in the arts, economics, education, health, and other fields.  Asheville, NC, and Oakland, CA were the two cities where live dialogues were conducted."

This is exciting: Asheville's arts infrastructure and leadership may have significantly shaped federal arts policy. I'll certainly be tuning in tomorrow, and will let you know what I learn here. You can find the webcast live at arts.gov.

Here's more information about the report:

WASHINGTON, DC -- How do you measure how art works -- on people, on communities, or on society? It's a broad question, and the National Endowment for the Arts offers an ambitious plan to "map" the arts to better understand and measure this complex, dynamic system. The NEA shares a new report, How Art Works, which describes the agency's five-year research agenda, framed and informed by a groundbreaking "system map" and measurement model. The announcement takes place at American University on Thursday, September 20, 2012, from 2:00 pm to 5:30 pm. The event is free and open to the public, and will be webcast live at arts.gov.

The How Art Works forum is led by Andrew Taylor, assistant professor at American University's Arts Management Program, which is hosting the event. Taylor is regarded as a thought leader in the field of arts management, and this is his first public event since arriving at American University. Other speakers will include NEA Chairman Rocco Landesman, NEA Director of Research & Analysis Sunil Iyengar; and Tony Siesfield, lead project consultant and partner, Monitor Institute, whose consultation resulted in the NEA report. Additionally, two panel discussions with leaders from practice, policy, and research will respond to the report, along with audience questions and discussion.

"The NEA is a national leader in commissioning, collecting, and disseminating objective and reliable data, research, and analysis about the arts and their effects on individuals and communities," said NEA Chairman Rocco Landesman. "For the first time, we have created a map that allows us to organize this work to see where gaps exist and to point to the next generation of research questions. We invite other public and private stakeholders to join us in using this map as a starting point for debate and inquiry." 

"My colleagues and I in the Arts Management Program at American University are thrilled to host a public forum on this important report," said Andrew Taylor. "It has never been more essential to build a system-wide view of the arts and how they work to impact our lives and our communities. We're looking forward to a vibrant discussion and debate in person and online."

The map is grounded in the theory that arts engagement contributes to quality of life in a virtuous cycle from the individual level to the societal level, and back. The map helps illustrate the dynamic, complex interactions that make up this particular system, from "inputs" such as education and arts infrastructure, to "outcomes" such as benefits of the arts to individuals and communities. The NEA developed the map through a series of dialogues with researchers, policymakers, and practitioners in the arts, economics, education, health, and other fields.

The NEA's new research agenda will use the system map as a conceptual framework for current, ongoing, and planned projects, to see how they relate to each other and to fill in research gaps. NEA research will fall into two broad categories: analyzing evidence of the arts' value and evidence of the arts' impact. For more than 30 years, the NEA has contributed to a wealth of research literature that measures aspects of the U.S. arts ecosystem, such as arts audiences, arts learners, arts workers, and arts organizations. Focusing on the arts' "value," such research is on display in the NEA's Survey of Public Participation on the Arts and Artists in the Workforce, and will continue under the new research agenda. More recently, though, the NEA has also explored impact analysis, or how the arts affect other domains of American life, such as education, health and well-being, community liveability, and economic prosperity. This new line of inquiry is revealed in reports such as The Arts and Achievement in At-Risk Youth: Findings from Four Longitudinal Studies, and in federal partnerships such as the NEA's Task Force on the Arts and Human Development, which brings together 14 federal agencies and departments to identify gaps and opportunities in research on the arts' potential effects across the lifespan, from childhood to old age.

Live event and webcast

The public forum takes place on Thursday, September 20, from 2:00 pm to 5:30 pm at the Abramson Family Recital Hall in the Katzen Arts Center at American University, 4400 Massachusetts Avenue, NW, Washington, DC. The event is free and open to the public, however seating is limited and registration is required. Register online at http://how-art-works.eventzilla.net/. Media may RSVP to Sally Gifford, NEA Public Affairs Specialist at 202-682-5606 or giffords@arts.gov. A free, live public webcast of the event will be available for viewing at both arts.gov, and american.edu/cas/arts-management. An archived version of the webcast also will be available at arts.gov. Follow the conversation with live-tweets @NEAArts, #HowArtWorks.

About NEA Research

The NEA is the only federal agency to conduct long-term and detailed analyses of arts participation. For more than 30 years, the NEA Office of Research & Analysis has produced periodic research reports, brochures, and notes on significant topics affecting artists and arts organizations, often in partnership with other federal agencies such as the U.S. Census Bureau and the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Recently, the NEA announced a new research grant opportunity to foster more research on the value and impact of the arts on the nation. The NEA is committed to extending the conversation about arts participation by making data available to both the research community and the public at large.

About American University

American University is a leader in global education, enrolling a diverse student body from throughout the United States and more than 140 countries. Located in Washington, D.C., the university provides opportunities for academic excellence, public service, and internships in the nation's capital and around the world.

About the National Endowment for the Arts

The National Endowment for the Arts was established by Congress in 1965 as an independent agency of the federal government. To date, the NEA has awarded more than $4 billion to support artistic excellence, creativity, and innovation for the benefit of individuals and communities. The NEA extends its work through partnerships with state arts agencies, local leaders, other federal agencies, and the philanthropic sector. To join the discussion on how art works, visit the NEA at www.arts.gov.

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