Blog :: 10-2011

Charting course for Blue Ridge Parkway's future

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10/31/2011 - Charting course for Blue Ridge Parkway's future
by Karen Chavez - Asheville Citizen Times

 

  ASHEVILLE -- Attention, all of you 15 million annual visitors to the Blue Ridge Parkway: The fate of the country's most beloved scenic roadway is now in your hands.

 That's the gist of four upcoming public meetings in North Carolina and Virginia, during which top parkway managers will discuss the just-released draft environmental impact statement of the first General Management Plan in the Blue Ridge Parkway's 75-year history. 

 "This will become the guide for park managers for decades to come as they make decisions on how to protect the resources," parkway Superintendent Phil Francis said of the document released for public review earlier this month. 

 "We may change these alternatives based on public comment. People need to read the plan and c ome out and tell us what they think." 

 Better start reading.

The hefty document is 640 pages, not including index, and was 10 years in the making, at a cost of $1.8 million. But park managers and others familiar with the plan say it is arranged in a way that allows people to focus on parkway areas important to them, without having to read every page.

And they stress the importance of public input on a plan for the parkway's future.

The parkway, a 469-mile scenic, two-lane roadway stretching from Shenandoah National Park in Virginia down to the Cherokee entrance of Great Smoky Mountains National Park, is the most visited unit of the National Park Service. It has no entrance fees, yet packs a walloping $2.3 billion economic impact on the 29 local counties through which it passes.

"For the general public, the General Management Plan can be pretty daunting," said Don Barger, an architect, who is the Southeast regional director of the National Parks Conservation Association.

"What I recommend is going to the map (within the plan) of someplace on the parkway you care about, such as Mount Pisgah Campground, flipping through it, and that will give you a better understanding," he said.

"A general management plan is basically a road map. It says 'this is the route we're going on.' It outlines what we call 'desired future conditions.' What do you hope your great-great-granddaughter will see?"

The draft parkway plan outlines three alternatives to compare the advantages of each. Alternative "A" is the "no action" alternative, which describes the parkway's current management practices and provides a basis for comparing the two "action" alternatives, B and C.

Alternative "B," the National Park Service's preferred alternative, emphasizes the original parkway design and traditional driving experience, while calling for enhancements to outdoor recreational opportunities, natural resource protection and visitor services.

The plan can be viewed online and at the public meetings. Comments may be submitted online or by mail by Dec. 16. The first meeting will be 3-7 p.m. Wednesday at the Folk Art Center.

Long time coming

"It is really unusual for a national park to be able to go 75 years without having a general management plan," Barger said, adding that while this fact might raise a few eyebrows, in the case of such a complex park, it's understandable.

"I'm glad they took the time they did to do it right, because it's the first one," he said. "It's so many pages, not because they put a lot of gibberish in, but because the management of the Blue Ridge Parkway really is that complex. I have never seen a better general management plan."

When the Blue Ridge Parkway was established in 1935, parkway managers set sail under the guidance of a master plan, said Gary Johnson, the parkway's recently retired landscape architect.

"A master plan is a series of drawings that showed how a park would be developed, where facilities would go, what would be included," Johnson said. "It was mostly facility and visitor use-related."

This was how most national parks were governed since the formation of the National Park Service in 1916, Johnson said. In 1978, with the Redwoods Act, Congress mandated that every unit of the National Park Service would have a general management plan that would address the natural resources of a park in more detail.

Johnson first came to the parkway in 1976, and work on a general management plan for the Blue Ridge Parkway got under way in 1979, he said, but was never finished. Park managers approached each request for new building construction, renovations or natural resource management on a case-by-case basis.

Johnson left the parkway and worked in design and engineering at 56 national parks. He returned to the parkway in 1994, with his goals set on completing the parkway plan.

The parkway received funding for the plan in 2000, and its staff worked with the Denver Service Center and some outside consulting firms on the socio-economic and regional transportation studies, to create the blueprint . The plan was finished just before Johnson's retirement this summer. He will re-emerge to attend the public meetings and share his intimate knowledge of the plan.

Management by color coding

One of the first steps in drafting the plan, Johnson said, was to take inventory of everything within the 81,000 acres and 1,200 mi les of parkway boundary, including plant and animal life, cultural sites, historic buildings, tunnels, bridges and overlooks, trails, campgrounds, concessions and more. Also mapped in detail were what kinds of activities typically take place at different areas of the parkway.

The crux of the plan hinges on the creation of eight "management zones" that best characterize different park features.

"We identified eight different zones for the parkway and created maps that show where the zones are," Johnson said. "They set the level of what to emphasize and what kind of visitor use is appropriate for that zone."

In Alternatives B and C, the management zones are color-coded for easy identification. For example, an area designated as "Special Natural Resources Zone," is shaded dark green, such as Craggy Gardens, to signify that it is home to threatened or endangered plant species, and visitor opportunities would be limited to minimize impact to its ecosystem.

"Historic Parkway Zones" are colored blue, including parts of Mount Pisgah, where the important aspects are the historically significant design, including bridges, tunnels and buildings. A"Recreation Zone" is colored orange, such as parts of Crabtree Meadows and Linville Falls, where recreational, educational and interpretive opportunities are favored.

"Regardless of who comes in to do work in the park in the future, this will tell them what's in the park, what's important and what they should or shouldn't do," Johnson said. "We've never put that in writing before. This will help future managers with decision making."

Parkway Chief of Natural and Cultural Resources Bambi Teague suggests people check out Table 3 on Page 55 of the plan before getting overwhelmed. This color-coded table helps break down each of the eight management zones for easier digestion.

Teague, who can visualize and vocalize from memory almost every curve and bend of the 469 miles of Parkway, started working on the parkway nearly 30 years ago and has been involved in the General Management Plan since the beginning.

Big changes ahead

Some of the biggest challenges to the parkway, Teague said, are encroaching residential and commercial development within the parkway's viewshed -- the land that can be seen while driving the parkway -- as well as increased visitor use and the types of activities those visitors are choosing.

"I estimate the parkway has grown about 20 percent, just since I started here," Teague said. "The roadways are getting bigger, and that changes the character of the parkway."

For a park that was conceived and designed during the Great Depression on the rural backbone of the Southern Appalachians, it faces increasing pressures from multiple uses -- much larger RVs that can't safely make turns within historic campgrounds, pullouts and picnic areas; a greater population "loving to death" trails at places like Craggy Gardens and Graveyard Fields; and requests for a variety of new uses such as rock climbing, horseback riding and mountain biking.

"When an idea surfaces in the park, we'd go to the plan and see what level of intervention we'd have," Teague said.

As an example, she points to the requests for enlarging turnaround areas in the Mount Pisgah Campground and adding showers and electric hookups. "In Alternative B, most of Pisgah is designated 'Historic' (blue). We would allow some changes, but we'd need to mimic the look of the buildings that are already there," she said.

One area Asheville area visitors will have a keen strong interest in is plans for Craggy Gardens, a high-elevation natural area beginning at Milepost 364, about 20 miles northeast of town. Under the NPS preferred Alternative B, the area is zoned as "Special Natural Resources" (dark green), which gives Craggy Gardens the highest level of protection.

Alternative B calls for restoring the natural bald between the Visitor Center and the picnic area to its historic size of 25 acres, from its current 12 acres, Teague said. It also calls for opening the visitor center nine months of the year instead of the current six, and closing the popular trail to Craggy Pinnacle.

"There are federally endangered plants up there. If people stayed on the trail and didn't go over the wall, it would be OK, but people go over the wall every day," Teague said. "In this case, public input will matter. That's what we want to hear from people."

The plan's Alternative C also calls for restoring the grassy bald but for leaving the Pinnacle Trail open for people to enjoy the rhododendron tunnels on the way to the summit view, while increasing signs, staffing and education to keep people on the trail.

"Natural and cultural resources is our focus," Teague said. "The third element is visual and aesthetic value. We are a designed park. That's a great, different layer that adds complexity."

An example of a current parkway proposal that would get guidance from a parkway plan is the creation of a new City of Asheville Overlook on the parkway, Teague said.

A resolution to support the proposal was passed by the Buncombe County Board of Commissioners, said chair David Gantt. The overlook, which would have parking and give visitors a view of the Asheville skyline, is proposed for Milepost 395.5, south of the N.C. 191 entrance.

Gantt said he hopes the overlook will mesh well with the new plan . "The timing is really good," he said. "There is a lot of unauthorized parking parking on the parkway parallel to the Mountains-to-Sea Trail. The new overlook would showcase Asheville and provide new parking on the parkway."

After reviewing public comment on the plan, parkway staff will prepare the final General Management Plan by the summer, Francis said, with any revisions based on feedback. After the plan is signed by the NPS Regional Director, the plan will be implemented.

"From 1994 to 2011, there was a whole lot of conversation and discussion about what can we do to protect the resources and the visitors," Johnson said. "To sit here and hold this document, there's a huge feeling of accomplishment."

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Building the green supply chain in the Asheville area

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10/31/2011 - Building the green supply chain in the Asheville area
by Dale Neal - Asheville Citizen Times

Green building and industry here in the mountains of Western North Carolina is growing!

 

 Deltec Homes was in the green building business long before sustainability was cool.

 Founded in 1968, Deltec manufactures distinctive round homes at its Bingham Road plant. The homes are sturdy enough to withstand hurricane-force winds. 

When Deltec President David Hall wanted his factory to become more energy-independent, he turned to Dave Hollister of Sundance Power Systems to install an array of electricity-producing solar panels on Deltec's roof. Now instead of bills from Progress Energy, Hall's company collects a monthly check from the utility.

"Business leaders have to balance the bottom line with stewardship," Hall said.

Hollister, in turn, has brought his business closer to home, buying tanks for his solar water-heating systems from a company in Raleigh, rather than in Jacksonville, Fla. "As energy becomes more expensive, we're going to have look toward more regional economies," Hollister said.

Both businessmen point to the partnership between Sundance and Deltec, demonstrating how Western North Carolina can build a green supply chain, linking a growing number of clean-energy companies across the mountains.

WNC's green advantage

From solar power installers and green builders to biofuel and methane gas captured from landfills for electricity, Western North Carolina boasts more clean energy companies per capita and more installed renewable energy than the rest of the state.

Each county in Western North Carolina boasts at least one clean-energy company in a growing industry cluster. Now business leaders and economic developers are trying to connect the dots that cluster our map into a job-creating industry to benefit the entire region.

Hollister and Hall were among the industry leaders who welcomed the EvolveEnergy Partnership, a new initiative launched last week by AdvantageWest, the regional economic development group. Also joining the partnership are Land of Sky Regional Council and several other government councils across 31 counties -- stretching from the mountains to Forsyth County.

EvolveEnergy Partnership will allow economic developers, policymakers, investors and business leaders to promote the region and attract more companies and jobs, organizers said.

"We know that growth in WNC's clean energy industry -- renewable energy, energy efficiency, and alternative fuels/vehicle technologies -- is outpacing both state and national averages," said Patrick Harper with Land of Sky.

From 2005- 09, even through the worst of the Great Recession, jobs in the region's clean-energy businesses grew 6.9 percent, while all other local industries saw a 7.9 percent decline in jobs.

"We also know that this growth is being led by small to midsize businesses," Harper said. "Behind the cluster analysis results and t he continued regional dialogue fostered by the EvolveEnergy Partnership, we're beginning to understand why."

In a presentation at the Diana Wortham Theatre, Austin consultant Angelos Angelou offered his analysis of the growing clean-energy clusters in the region and the potential to become a world leader.

Angelou dismissed the political argument that solar and renewable energies are propped up only by tax subsidies, pointing to the $38 billion spent in subsidies for U.S. oil companies. "We don't spend that kind of money on renewables. We're only asking for the chance to compete on a level playing field," he said.

Countries like Germany and China have made the political decisions to invest in clean energy, Angelou said.

"I don't understand our hesitation in investing in renewable energy for the future. If we invest now, we can create the jobs of the future and drive down the costs. There is good reason to believe that solar energy is here to stay, creating opportunities for entrepreneurs."

Angelou urged entrepreneurs, which Asheville has a rich supply of, to see where they could fill missing links in a green supply chain, for example, fabricating water heater tanks for solar companies.

Paul Quinlan of the N.C. Sustainable Energy Association sees an advantage that the mountains have over other regions of the state. "Many areas are trying to brand themselves as green, but here you have the leadership, the companies and the diversity."

Hall sees the EvolveEnergy Partnership and the energy cluster analysis as good first steps on the road to a sustainable market for green companies in Western North Carolina.

"As a businessman, you have to make sure you have a market, that you can supply a quality product at a fair price. This supply chain has to be developed from soup to nuts, from concept and design all the way to sales, delivery and installation to a market that wants what you have."

Hollister agreed that EvolveEnergy Partnership initiative is a start. "We have the building blocks for creating a center for renewable energy in the region. The fact that people are putting their energy into that effort is fundamentally important. From my perspective, it's taken a long time."

Homegrown energy

In a previous life, Hollister and Hall might have considered themselves political enemies. Hollister once served as an activist organizer for Greenpeace, which targeted International Paper, where Hall worked as an executive.

Now, the two men enjoy each other's company. Both have found common ground that running a green business is more about sticking to values than the bottom line.

Hall has made the hard decision to use only American suppliers. He's found the last nail maker manufacturing in the U.S. He's nearly made it work, except for the spruce lumber that Deltec has to import from Canada.

"You could have gone out and bought the cheapest nail, the cheapest wood," Hollister said in praise of Hall. "But you've got values you're placing on your company which is to say 'I want to buy from my country. I want to buy as locally as possible.'

"We are never going to get where we want to go until people guide their companies by a set of values that go beyond the bottom line," Hollister said.

Likewise, Sundance is trying to bring business back home, and Hollister sees opportunity for more manufacturing in the region. "We have the empty factories all sitting around us."

Hall sees solar power as officially part of the mainstream when a homeowner can see that electricity from solar panels has the same cost as electricity generated from fossil fuels. "That will create a sustainable market."

In the meantime, Deltec is also working with Sundance to provide solar power and solar hot water for the home designs manufactured in the Asheville factory.

For Hollister, solar power in particular offers the regional economy a chance to generate more of its own electricity, instead of importing the coal, oil and other fuels that puts North Carolina at an estimated $3 billion energy deficit each year.

"You couldn't be doing business with China unless energy was dirt cheap. Before the advent of really cheap energy, all economies were local. As energy becomes more constricted and more expensive, naturally we're going to look more regionally for the things we need. The pendulum will swing back," Hollister said.

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Biltmore Estate to build 6-acre solar array in Asheville

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10/28/2011 - Biltmore Estate to build 6-acre solar array in Asheville
by Jon Ostendorff - Asheville Citizen Times

 

ASHEVILLE -- One of America's most famous homes is going green.

Officials at Biltmore Estate said Thursday that installation of 5,000 solar panels on six acres will be completed over two months at a cost of $5.2 million. The land is on the east side of the estate below Antler Hill Village visible from Interstate 40.

It will be one of the largest solar arrays in North Carolina, said Chuck Pickering, Biltmore's vice president of agriculture and land use.

The system will supply 25 percent of the estate's energy. Biltmore Estate uses an average of four megawatts of energy per month.

Sustainability is nothing new at the estate, said Kathleen Mosher, communications director.

"This is part of the family heritage," she said.

George Vanderbilt had envisioned a self-sufficient country estate modeled after private manors in Europe when he had Biltmore constructed in the late 1800s.

The main house once had its own generator that created enough power for the 250-room home with electricity left over to sell to the city of Asheville.

Vanderbilt probably would have used solar panels had they been available in 1895, said Mosher and Pickering.

Other environmental efforts at the estate including sustainable forestry, soil and water conservation, employee environmental teams, field-to-table initiatives, recycling, and waste stream reduction, the company said.

Biltmore won the Triple Bottom Line Award from Sustainable North Carolina in 2008.

The solar panels measure 3 1/2 feet by 5 feet with four to a rack and seven racks to an array. SunEnergy1 of Mooresville is installing the arrays.

The racks, which face south, are five feet tall in the front and 10 feet tall in the back.

The height means Biltmore can continue to use the 6 acres as farmland. Free range chickens will live there, Pickering said.

He said the birds don't mind the panels.

"It gives them protection from hawks and other predators," he said.

The racks are mounted deep in the ground, without concrete anchors to minimize land disturbance. They are designed to withstand wind.

The solar arrays will one day be part of Biltmore's tours, Mosher said.

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Rain very likely in Asheville on opening day of Moogfest

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10/28/2011 - Rain very likely in Asheville on opening day of Moogfest
by Romando Dixson - Asheville Citizen Times

 

ASHEVILLE -- Music lovers may want to come prepared for wet weather during this weekend's Moogfest. Rain is likely on the opening day of the popular electronic music festival, but the show will go on.

There is a 90 percent chance of rain today, according to the National Weather Service, and a significant drop in temperatures will accompany the rain. The Asheville area has enjoyed highs in the 70s this week, but the thousands of visitors to the city, and others, will have to deal with the effects of a cold front this weekend.

"Temperatures will be about 10 degrees cooler than normal for the weekend," said Terry Benthall, meteorologist with the National Weather Service. "They've been a few degrees above normal for the past several days."

The Weather Service predicts a high of 48 today, with temperatures falling into the low 40s by 5 p.m. and near freezing overnight.

There is a chance of rain and sleet early Saturday morning, but rain is not expected to be much of a factor after that. Highs in the mid-50s are expected Saturday and Sunday with mostly sunny skies, which should give music enthusiasts a chance to enjoy the new outdoor Animoog Playground without worrying about rain.

"Most of the weekend is going to be nice," Benthall said.

Rain or shine, many downtown restaurants and bars are expecting a big bump in business. Roy Lowery, a bartender at Hannah Flanagan's Irish Pub of Asheville, said last year the music festival was better for business than Bele Chere.

"All of our employees made more money, and we had more sales than during Bele Chere," he said. "I hope we get the same this year."

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Asheville area Adventure of the Week: Hike at Mount Pisgah

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10/27/2011 - Asheville area Adventure of the Week: Hike at Mount Pisgah
by Karen Chavez - Asheville Citizen Times

It's always an adventure in Asheville!!

 

What: Hike on Mount Pisgah and Fryingpan Mountain trails.

Where: Blue Ridge Parkway at Milepost 407 and 409, about 25 miles southwest of Asheville.

When: Whenever the Blue Ridge Parkway is open.

Distance: Mount Pisgah Trail is 2.6 miles round trip and Fryingpan is 2 miles round trip.

Difficulty: Moderate to strenuous.

Details: The trail to the summit of Mount Pisgah is one of the classic Western North Carolina hikes. The Mount Pisgah Trail is a steep climb of more than 700 feet in a mile, but the payoff is an observation deck at the 5,721-foot summit with the last bits of autumn views across the Blue Ridge Mountains.

Bring drinking water and snacks for humans as well as the dogs to enjoy at the top.

The trail is well-traveled, yet has plenty of roots and rocks, so wear sturdy shoes with good ankle support. Dogs must be on a leash.

For a less steep trail with sturdier footing, but also with great views, head a couple of miles farther south on the parkway to the Fryingpan Trail. Start at Forest Service Road 450 at Milepost 409.6 for a mile-long hike along the road to the top of Fryingpan Mountain. There is a fire tower and great views of the surrounding forest on a clear day.

This is also a good weekend to take advantage of some of the parkway amenities before they close for the winter.

The Mount Pisgah picnic area at Milepost 407.8; the Pisgah Inn and its restaurant, gift shop and country store (Milepost 408.6); and the Mount Pisgah campground (Milepost 408.8) all close for the season on Monday. The Pisgah Inn restaurant is open 7:30 a.m.-9 p.m. daily through Monday.

The trails, however, are open year-round, weather and road conditions permitting.

Directions: From Asheville, take the Blue Ridge Parkway south to Milepost 407. The parking lot for the Mount Pisgah trailhead is on the left. Continue to the second parking area, where the road dead-ends. It is about 25 miles southwest of Asheville.

Information: Call the Blue Ridge Parkway Visitor Center at 298-5330 or visit www.nps.gov/blri. To check weather and road conditions on the parkway, call the automated information line at 298-0398.

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TAILGATE MARKETS!

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10/26/2011 - TAILGATE MARKETS!
by Asheville Citizen Times

TAILGATE MARKET INFORMATION FROM AROUND THE CITY AND REGION...

 

Asheville City
Market

When: Saturdays, 8 a.m.-1 p.m.
Where: Parking lot of the Public Works Building at 161 S. Charlotte St.
Asheville City
Market South

When: Wednesdays, 2-6 p.m.
Where: Town Square Boulevard in the center of Biltmore Park Town Square, Interstate 26-Long Shoals Road exit in South Asheville.
Big Ivy Tailgate
Market

When: Saturdays, 9 a.m.-noon
Where: Parking lot of the old Barnardsville fire station, across from the post office on N.C. 197.
Black Mountain
Tailgate Market

When: Saturdays, 9 a.m.-noon
Where: Behind the First Baptist Church in Black Mountain at 130 Montreat Road.
Mission Hospital
Tailgate Market

When: Thursdays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Where: At the back entrance to the Mission Hospital Heart Center on the Memorial Campus.
Montford Tailgate Market

When: Wednesdays, 2-6 p.m.
Where: Parking lot of the Asheville Visitors Center off Montford Avenue.
North Asheville
Tailgate Market

When: Saturdays, 8 a.m.-noon
Where: UNC Asheville Campus Commuter Lot C. Take Weaver Boulevard.

Weaverville

Tailgate Market

When: Wednesdays, 2:30-6:30 p.m.
Where: On the hill overlooking Lake Louise behind the Community Center on Weaverville Highway.
Wednesday Co-op Market

When: Wednesdays, 2-6:30 p.m.
Where: 76 Biltmore Ave., in the parking lot next to the French Broad Food Co-op.
West Asheville
Tailgate Market

When: Tuesdays, 3:30-6:30 p.m.
Where: 718 Haywood Road, in the parking area between the Grace Baptist Church and Sun Trust Bank.

 Get sweet treats this week at area farmers tailgate markets, but not the kind you think.

Sure, there will be Halloween- and fall-inspired cupcakes, pies and tarts (and even a chance to trick-or-treat -- more later). The real sweet story is the season's veggies.

The first freeze will actually make fall favorites like kale, broccoli, parsnips and carrots sweeter and more flavorful than they've been so far. How? Kale, for example, reacts to cold conditions by producing sugars. And root veggies convert their existing starches to sugar once the cold hits. Don't worry, the freeze isn't the end for these veggies. A second frost only intensifies their flavor more, and most will remain at markets through the end of the season.

Of course, sweet fruits -- from apples to pears -- can be found, too. At Asheville City Market, don't pass by McConnell Farms' unnamed heirloom pears. Farmer Danny McConnell says the mysterious variety is wonderful baked in a homemade tart. Blue Meadow Farms (West Asheville Tailgate Market, Asheville City Market downtown and South) has been bringing sweet and juicy Sugar Baby watermelons to market. They're down to the last melons of the season, so grab them while you can.

Starting your gift hunt? More and more artisan vendors are joining tailgates. The number of arts and crafts vendors at Asheville City Market will reach 10 this Saturday, the most ever for an October date. (November and December dates promise even more.) You can even find handmade jewelry made by a (very talented) 11-year-old, Jenni Gems. Saturday will also be the market's final mug promotion. While supplies last, purchase a brand-new market mug and receive a free coffee, tea or hot chocolate. Asheville City Market runs 8 a.m.- 1 p.m.

Next Tuesday, trick-or-treat at the Historic Marion Tailgate Market. Trick-or-treating will run 3-4 p.m. with other special fall market activities until 5 p.m.

On Thursday, Black Mountain Tailgate Market will host a benefit tasting event at Pisgah Brewing Co. 4-7 p.m. The event will offer tastes of local foods from market farmers, live music and more. Find information at www.blackmountaintailgatemarket.org.

Most area markets remain open through the end of the month. Many run through November and into December.

 

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Weaverville at a Glance

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10/25/2011 - Weaverville at a Glance
by Barbara Blake - Asheville Citizen Times

WEAVERVILLE AT A GLANCE!!

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Asheville Culinary Calendar

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10/24/2011 - Asheville Culinary Calendar
by Asheville Citizen Times

Want to get some information and instruction from those folks making the Asheville and Western North Carolina Culinary scene??  Take a look below for some great events and classes that might give you a "Taste of Asheville"...and Western North Carolina!!

 

     EVENTS

 WINE TASTING: 6:30-9 p.m. Tuesday, Purple Onion, 16 Main St., Saluda, 749-1179.

 WINE & DINE: Exploring California Wineries: 7-9 p.m. Wednesday, Table Wine, 1550 Hendersonville Road, Asheville. $30, $24 for Grape Nuts. RSVP and payment required. 505-8588.

FRESH PRODUCE SAFETY: 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Thursday, N.C. Cooperative Extension Service, 94 Coxe Ave., Asheville. Individuals growing produce for sale and gardeners will learn the latest in ways to safely handle their farm/garden produce. $15 includes materials and lunch. Register by today at 2555-5522.

"EVERYONE COOKS!" COOKING CLASS: 5:30-7:30 p.m. every Thursday in Swannanoa. Learn to create sumptuous vegetarian meals. All skill levels welcome for this hands-on adventure. $15, cooked meals included. Call Michael Gentry at 273-6542 for reservation.

TASTING OF MONSTROUS MALBECS: 5:30-7:30 p.m. Friday, The Weinhaus, 86 Patton Ave., Asheville. French and Argentine wines with light hors d'ouvres. $10. 254-6453.

FRENCH COUNTRY WINE DINNER: 6-9:30 p.m. Friday, Grand Bohemian Hotel, Biltmore Village, Asheville, with artist Jean Claude Roy. $99. To RSVP, call 398-5555 or e-mail gbagallery@bohemianasheville.com by Oct. 26.

BREAD MAKING CLASS: 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Oct. 29, Stecoah Valley Center, 121 Schoolhouse Road, Robbinsville. Take home your own jar of starter. $25. Registration required. 479-3364.

HALLOWEEN DINNER: Wine, dinner and ghost stories with entertainer David Fore, 5:30-9:30 p.m. Oct. 29, Beechwood Inn, Beechwood Drive (off Highway 76), Clayton, Ga. $85. 706-782-5485.

WINE DINNER: 7-9:30 p.m. Nov. 1, Vincenzo's Ristorante, Asheville. Hosted by The Weinhaus. $60. 254-6453.

VEGAN COOKING CLASSES: "Wonderful Soups" 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Nov. 5, $45; naturally fermented sauerkraut workshop 10-11:30 a.m. Nov. 12, $20. Lenore's Natural Cuisine, 264 Ox Creek Road, Weaverville. 645-1412 or visit www.lenoresnatural.com.

CREOLE/CAJUN-THEMED DINNER: Nov. 11, On The Verandah Restaurant, 1536 Franklin Road, Highlands. Live music. $65. Call 526-2338 for time.

WEINHAUS CUSTOMER APPRECIATION: 6-8 p.m. Nov. 11, The Weinhaus, 86 Patton Ave., Asheville, Bring a dish to share and sample dozens of wines. 254-6453.

VIVA LA FRANCE WINE DINNER: 6:30 p.m. Nov. 11, The Inn at Half Mile Farm, 214 Half Mile Drive, Highlands. $100. 800-946-6822 or www.halfmilefarm.com.

CRAFT 2 TABLE BEER DINNER: 6:30 p.m. Nov. 11, Ruka's Table, 163 Henry Wright Road, Highlands. The best and hard to find craft beers with native food. Call 526-3636 or highlandsrestaurantgroup@gmail.com for details.

MOLLYDOOKER SHAKE UP: 6:30 p.m. Nov. 11, Lakeside Restaurant, 531 Smallwood Ave., Highlands. Australian Mollydooker wines, dinner, and the newest dance move, The Mollydooker Shake. $150. 526-9419.

A TASTE OF THE SOUTH: 6:30 p.m. Nov. 11, The Farm Pavilion at Old Edwards Inn, off Arnold Road, Highlands, with Chef Klapdohr and his local farm-to-table providers. Food, live music, meet the farmers and producers. $95. 787-4263.

OPUS ONE EXPERIENCE: Wine dinner 7-11 p.m. Nov. 12, Lakeside Restaurant, 531 Smallwood Ave., Highlands. Reservations required. $175. 526-9419.

TASTE OF ASHEVILLE: Food from 37 Asheville retaurants and wine, 7-9 p.m. Nov. 17, The Venue, 21 N. Market St., Asheville. $70 single, $125 couple. Visit www.airasheville.org or call 338-9839.

TASTING OF HOLIDAY DIGESTIFS: 5:30-7:30 p.m. Nov. 25, The Weinhaus, 86 Patton Ave., Asheville. Sherries, ports, dessert-style wines. $10. 254-6453.

WINE DINNER & WINERY TOUR: 6-9:30 p.m. Dec. 2, Biltmore Estate. Hosted by The Weinhaus. $65. 254-6453.

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Asheville-area outdoors calendar

News

News

10/20/2011 - Asheville-area outdoors calendar
by Asheville Citizen Times

AN amazing comprehensive list of Fall clubs, races, things to do, outdoor events and organizations, all here in the mountains of Western North Carolina!  Links, contact information and more - something for everyone!!

 

RUNNING - RACES

ROCK THE QUARRY: Four-mile trail challenge starts at 9 a.m. Saturday, at Grove Stone Quarry in Black Mountain. $25 at www.active.com.

BLACK MOUNTAIN RUNNING CO. 5K: Free 5K as part of celebration of new Black Mountain Running Co. running shop, 106 W. State St. 5K starts at 9 a.m. Saturday, at Black Mountain Primary School Greenway. For more information, Call 669-7186 or visit www.blackmountainrunning.com.

POWER OF PINK: Fifth annual 20-mile relay for five-women teams, Pink 4-mile Run/walk for everyone and Bubble Gum Fun Run/Walk. Fundraiser for breast cancer detection programs in Haywood County. Starts at 8 a.m. Oct. 29 at MedWest Health and Fitness Center, Clyde. $200 per relay team by Oct. 26, $25 for Pink 4-Miler by Oct. 21, $10 for Fun Run. For more information, call 400-5868 or visit www.medwesthealth.org.

POINT LOOKOUT LIGHTNING 5K: Starts at 10 a.m. Oct. 29 on Point Lookout Trail near Old Fort. at the Old Fort Picnic Ground off Mill Creek Road. $25. www.lightning5k.leetiming.com/info.html.

SUPERHERO 5K: Starts at 4:30 p.m. Nov. 12 at Asheville Brewing Co., 77 Coxe Ave. Dress as your favorite superhero. $23 at www.active.com. Visit www.ashevillepizza.com.

TAILS AND TRAILS 5K: For people and their dogs, Nov. 19 at the Buncombe County Sports Park. Human-only 5K starts at 8:30 a.m. and Run/Walk 5K for dogs and their humans starts at 10 a.m. Benefit for Asheville Humane Society and the Buncombe County Sports Park. $20 per race before Nov. 9, $25 after, or $30 for both races before Nov. 9, $35 after. For more information, call 250-4260.

EARTH FARE TURKEY TROT 5K: Jus' Running hosts race starting at 9 a.m. Thanksgiving Day at Carrier Park, Amboy Road. $25 at www.setupevents.com through Nov. 21. Visit www.jusrunning.com.

HOT CHOCOLATE 10K and KIDS HILL CLIMB: Registration now open for Isaac Dickson Elementary School race, starting at 9 a.m. Jan. 21 at the school, 125 Hill St., Asheville. Adult 10K $27.50, youth 10K (17 and younger) $20, Hill Climb (12 and younger) $12, Marshmallow Dash (6 and younger) $12. www.hotchocolate10k.com.

TSALI FROST FOOT: Registration open for the 2012 Tsali Frosty Foot Fest 50K (31 miles), 30K (18 miles) and 8K (5 miles) Jan. 7 in the Tsali Recreation Area of Graham County on www.active.com. 50K is $50 until Dec. 7, $65 until Jan. 5 online, 30K is $35/$45, 8K is $25/$30. Visit www.tsalifrostyfoot.com.

RUNNING CLUBS

ASHEVILLE TRACK CLUB: Promotes and support the running communities of Western North Carolina by providing information, education, training, social and sporting events for competitive and non-competitive runners. Visit www.ashevilletrackclub.org.

FOUR SEASONS RUNNING CLUB: Official running club of Hendersonville and Henderson County. For more information, call 388-3200 or e-mail fourseasonsrunningclub@gmail.com.

GIRLS ON THE RUN of WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA: Registration now open for the program that teaches girls in third-eighth grade to develop self-respect and healthy lifestyles and prepares them to participate in a 5K run at the end of the 12-week, 24-lesson program. Call Audrey McElwain at 713-4290, visit www.gotrwnc.org or e-mail at audrey.mcelwain@girlsontherun.org.

JUS' RUNNING: Groups meet for various levels of road and trail runs and track workouts at the Jus' Running store, 523 Merrimon Ave., Asheville. Call 252-7867, e-mail jusrun@bellsouth.net or visit www.jusrunning.com.

DIAMOND BRAND RUNNING GROUPS: Meets at 6 p.m. every Wednesday. Runs are 3-6 miles at an 8-10 minute pace. All running levels welcome. Contact mmcbride@diamondbrand.com.

FOOTRX RUN: Meets at 8 a.m. Saturdays at the south exit of Hendersonville Road and the Blue Ridge Parkway. All ages and abilities welcome. Call Chuck Martin at 687-3476.

SWAIN COUNTY TRAIL RUNNERS: Long-run group meets 8 a.m. Saturdays at the Deep Creek Trailhead parking area in Bryson City. All runs are on trails in the Smokies or Tsali Recreation Area. All distances, paces, ages welcome. Call 399-0989, 488-6769 or e-mail wdtreern@yahoo.com.

MULTISPORT/ SWIMMING/ ON THE WATER

ASHEVILLE MASTERS SWIMMING: Organized workouts, 5:45-7:15 a.m. Monday, Wednesday and Friday, at the Asheville School, and at 7:30-9 a.m. Saturdays at Warren Wilson College. Coached workouts 5:45-7:15 a.m. Tuesday and Thursday at WWC. Competitive, fitness and triathlon swimmers welcome for training, stroke work and socializing. More at www.ashevillemasters.com.

SWIM CLINICS: All clinics are at Warren Wilson College pool in Swannanoa. Call 771-3005.

HIKING/WALKING

ASHEVILLE AMBLERS WALKING CLUB: Club features free, monthly 5K or 10K (6.2-mile) noncompetitive walks in Asheville, Black Mountain and Hendersonville. Associated with American Volkssport Association. Visit www.amblers.homestead.com or call 687-2777.

ASHEVILLE HIKING MEET-UP GROUP: Social and hiking club made up of all ages and professions. Hikes take place Saturdays and Sundays. Free. Visit www.meetup.com/ashevillehiking.

ASHEVILLE YMCA WALKING CLUB: Meets noon Tuesdays at the YMCA on Woodfin Street. Open to everyone. Call 210-9622.

BLUE RIDGE PARKWAY: The most-visited unit of the National Park Service, stretching 469 miles from Shenandoah National Park in Virginia to the Great Smoky Mountains in Cherokee. Call 298-0398 for road and weather conditions or visit www.nps.gov/blri.

CAROLINA MOUNTAIN CLUB: More than 175 hikes a year. Call Stuart English at 883-2447 or visit www.carolinamtnclub.org for schedule of hikes. Hikes are free. Nonmembers should call ahead.

DIAMOND BRAND OUTDOORS: Gary Eblen leads various group walks throughout the year on the trails and in local parks. Call 209-1538.

GIRLS-ONLY HIKE CLUB: Women-only hike the third Saturday of each month. Registration is required. Call 209-1503 or e-mail Kate Shirey at kshirey@diamondbrand.com.

NANTAHALA HIKING CLUB: A hiking/trail maintenance club based in the Franklin-Highlands area. For a schedule of guided hikes, call Kay Coriell at 369-6820 or visit www.nantahalahikingclub.org.

PISGAH HIKERS: Five different hiking groups meet Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays in Brevard. Hikes range 3-12 miles. Visit http://pisgahhikers.squarespace.com.

SOUTHERN APPALACHIANS HIGHLANDS CONSERVANCY: Nonprofit working to conserve the clean water, unique plant and animal habitat, local farmland and recreational treasures of the Southern Appalachian Mountains. Visit www.appalachian.org.

SWANNANOA VALLEY MUSEUM: Hosts various hikes, camps and community events throughout the year. At 223 W. State St., Black Mountain. Call 669-9566 for information and to register for events. Programs and activities are available by appointment year-round.

WOODFIN YMCA WALKING CLUB: Meets 9 a.m. Mondays at the bird sanctuary at Beaver Lake, Merrimon Avenue. Open to everyone. Call Lynn at 768-1338 or visit http://ymcawnc.org.

HUNTING/FISHING

CASTING FOR RECOVERY: A support and educational program for breast cancer survivors, now taking applications for two free weekend retreats for women of all ages, in any stage of breast cancer. Learn the art and skill of fly fishing. Retreat date i s Oct. 21-23 at Lake Logan. 215-4234 or www.castingforrecovery.org.

FLY-FISHING CLASSES: Rivers Edge Outfitters in Cherokee conducts free fly-fishing classes every Saturday at 10 a.m. For more, call 497-9300.

HCC HUNTER SAFETY COURSES: Haywood Community College's Natural Resources Division and the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission offer courses 6-9:30 p.m. Nov. 7-9 in rooms 309 and 310 on the HCC campus. Free. Register at www.ncwildlife.org.

N.C. WILDLIFE RESOURCES COMMISSION: State agency regulating hunting, fishing and trapping seasons and rules.For more information, visit www.ncwildlife.org.

Delayed Harvest Trout Waters Open: Regulations on 26 trout waters in 15 WNC counties are now in effect. No trout can be harvested or possessed from these waters between Oct. 1 and one half-hour after sunset on June 1. No natural bait is allowed, and anglers can fish only with single-hook, artificial lures. For more, visit www.ncwildlife.org.

WNC FLY FISHING EXPO: Third annual Expo is Nov. 5 and 6 at the WNC Agricultural Center in Fletcher, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Nov. 5 and 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Nov. 6. Speakers, demos, programs, beer, barbecue, gear manufacturers and sales. Tickets are $10 for adults and free for ages 15 and younger. Visit www.wncflyfishingexpo.com.

CLUBS

FRENCH BROAD RIFLES: Meet for muzzle-loading target shooting at 9 a.m. the second Saturday of each month at the club's range in Madison County. E-mail hchadw1932@aol.com.

LAND O' SKY TROUT UNLIMITED: Asheville-based organization of anglers and conservationists dedicated to the protection of trout and their habitat. Visit www.landoskytu.com. Meetings are at 7 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month.

LAND OF THE SKY BASSMASTERS: WNC's oldest bass club and NC BASS Federation affiliated club meets the first Tuesday of the month at 6:30 p.m. at Bubba Q's Restaurant across from airport. Serious anglers can build friendships, camaraderie and angling knowledge. For more, call 681-0113.

PIGEON VALLEY BASSMASTERS: New members welcome. Regular meetings are at 7 p.m. the second Monday of each month at Shoney's Restaurant, at Exit 44 off I-40. For more, call Patty Blanton at 712-2846.

PISGAH CHAPTER OF TROUT UNLIMITED: Hendersonville-based anglers and conservationists with members in Polk, Henderson and Transylvania counties. Visit www.main.nc.us/PCTU.

Clubs/Events

ASHEVILLE ROWING CLUB: A nonprofit athletic and social organization dedicated to promoting health, fitness and fun through rowing. For details, visit www.ashevillerowing.org.

ASHEVILLE TRIATHLON CLUB: For competitive and beginner triathletes. Club provides resources, training, racing and social opportunities. Call Greg Duff at 400-5868.

ASHEVILLE YOUTH ROWING ASSOCIATION: For ages 13-18, a youth rowing program at Lake Julian on Saturdays, Sundays and two afternoons per week. Call Jack Gartner at 230-3901 or visit www.ashevilleyouthrowing.com.

GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS TRIATHLON CLUB: Hayesville-based club for those interested in running, biking and swimming competitions. Races throughout the year. For more information. call Scott Hanna at 389-6982, e-mail tri2000@dnet.net or visit www.gsmtc.com.

GREEN RIVER ADVENTURES: Saluda-based guide for professional kayaking instruction, inflatable kayaking trips and custom adventure experiences. Call 800-335-1530 or visit www.greenriveradventures.com.

NANTAHALA OUTDOOR CENTER: Outdoor outfitter, providing whitewater rafting, paddling instruction, adventure travel, group adventure programs, festivals and events, on U.S. 19 W. in the Nantahala Gorge, west of Bryson City. Call 888-905-7238 or visit www.noc.com.

CYCLING

SWANK 65: The 13 annual Swank 65 Mountain Bike Journey starts at 10 a.m. Nov. 6 at Cove Creek Campground in Pisgah National Forest. Entry fee is $110 through Oct. 7, $120 after. Visit www.blueridgeadventures.net.

ASHEVILLE BICYCLE RACING CLUB: Promotes amateur bicycle racing in WNC. Members get organized training rides, coaching and financial assistance. www.abrc.net.

ASHEVILLE WOMEN'S CYCLING: All-female cycling club and all-female racing team, Team Prestige Subaru. Promote recreational road and trail cycling among women. www.ashevillewomenscycling.com.

BLUE RIDGE BICYCLE CLUB: Encourages safe and responsible recreational bicycling in WNC. Weekly rides ranging from novice-advanced levels. Rides usually have a designated leaders and cyclists will not be left behind. For more, visit www.blueridgebicycleclub.org.

PISGAH AREA SORBA: Chapter of the Southern Off-Road Bicycle Association, dedicated to improving technical off-road biking programs through advocacy for quality trail systems. Visit www.pisgahareasorba.org.

TRACK CYCLING CLINICS/TRAINING: Clinics and skills practice, 9 a.m.-noon Saturdays, Carrier Park, Amboy Road, Asheville. Open to all ages. Email mpbikegirl@aol.com. www.mellowdrome.com.

CAROLINA YOUTH MOUNTAIN BIKE LEAGUE: Races for riders in grades K-12, including bike related contests, healthy food, health workshops, professional mountain bikers. Call 230-0985 or www.cymbl.org. $25 per race of $100 for five-race series. Ages 6 and younger race free. Championship race is Oct. 23 at Falling Creek Camp, Tuxedo.

BRBC TUESDAY MORNING RIDES: The Blue Ridge Bicycle Club holds rides the first Tuesday of the month starting at Fletcher Park. All other Tuesday's rides start from Liberty Bicycles,1378 Hendersonville Road. Visit www.blueridgebicycleclub.org.

PARKS, CLUBS, & MORE

ASHEVILLE LAWN BOWLING: Meet 2-4 p.m.W ednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays, weather permitting, at Carrier Park green on Amboy Road. Free instruction and the use of club bowls. Call Hans at 684-1815 or Stan at 665-7768.

ASHEVILLE MUSHROOM CLUB: Meets monthly at the WNC Nature Center on Gashes Creek Road in Asheville. Meetings are open to the public. Membership is required to participate in forays. $18 individuals, $25 family. www.ashevillemushroomclub.com.

ASHEVILLE PARKS OUTDOOR ADVENTURES: Asheville Parks, Recreation and Cultural Arts offers many opportunities for outdoor adventure this winter and spring. Fees are listed for Asheville city residents and for non-residents. Call Christen McNamara at 251-4029 or e-mail outdoorprograms@ashevillenc.gov.

ASHEVILLE ZIPLINE CANOPY ADVENTURES: Tours run at 9 and 10:30 a.m. and 12:30, 2 and 4 p.m. daily. The full course takes 2 1/2 hours. Cost is $45-$79 per person. Through Sept. 30, locals can zip for half-price. Call 877-247-5538 or visit www.ashevilleziplinecanopyadventures.com.

WESTERN CAROLINA BOTANICAL CLUB: Identifies and studies native plants and their habitats and encourages members and the public to protect and preserve the biodiversity of our natural world. Weekly field trips, community service projects, workshops and more. Beginners are welcome. Call 696-2077.

BLUE RIDGE NATURALIST CENTER: Various programs, walks and seminars for the community. At UNC Asheville. Call 251-6198 for more information or to register for programs.

CARL SANDBURG HOME: National park located in Flat Rock. Tours of the home (admission fee), several miles of hiking trails, gardens, descendants of Mrs. Sandburg's dairy goat herd. Free programs year-round. 693-4178 or www.nps.gov/carl.

CAROLINA MOUNTAIN LAND CONSERVANCY: Hendersonville-based nonprofit dedicated to land preservation. Guided hikes, outreach events and volunteer opportunities. Contact Aimee McGinley, outreach@carolinamountain.org, 697-5777 or visit http://carolinamountain.org.

CHIMNEY ROCK PARK: North Carolina's newest state park is 25 miles southeast of Asheville. Hiking trails, guided rock climbing, bird watching, children's programs. Admission fee. Call 625-9611, 800-277-9611 or visit www.chimneyrockpark.com.

CRADLE OF FORESTRY: Site of the first forestry school in America, founded in 1898. CFC strives to stimulate interest in the relationship between people and forests. On U.S. 276 in Pisgah National Forest. Entry fee is $6 for ages 16 and older, $3 for ages 15 and younger and America the Beautiful and Golden Age pass holders. Visit www.cradleofforestry.com.

Legend of Tommy Hod
ges: Outdoor drama on the paved Biltmore Campus Trail, 6:15, 7:30 and 8:45 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Oct. 21 & 22. Wear good walking shoes, dress warmly and bring a flashlight.

DIAMOND BRAND OUTDOORS: Outdoor enthusiasts have opportunity to participate in several types of free instructional clinics and special events. A complete schedule and information can be found at www.diamondbrand.com.

DUPONT STATE FOREST: Miles of multiuse trails, waterfalls and lakes straddling Henderson and Transylvania counties. No admission fee. Visit www.dupontforest.com.

ELISHA MITCHELL AUDUBON SOCIETY: Promotes an awareness and appreciation of nature, to preserve and protect wildlife and natural ecosystems and to encourage responsible environmental stewardship. Offers bird walks, naturalist programs. Visit www.main.nc.us/emas.

ENVIRONMENTAL AND CONSERVATION ORGANIZATION: Hendersonville-based conservation nonprofit. Guided hikes and community events. Call 692-0385 or visit www.eco-wnc.org.

FLETCHER DISC GOLF: Fletcher Parks and Recreation-hosted disc golf doubles program is at 5:30 p.m. Thursdays at Fletcher Community Park. Program to players of any ability. Loaner discs available. Visit www.fletcherparks.org.

FONTANA VILLAGE: Local author and hiker Jerry Span leads family-friendly, diverse programs throughout the year. For information or to register, call 498-2211, ext. 144.

FOOTHILLS EQUESTRIAN NATURE CENTER: FENCE offers 384 acres of hardwood forest, meadow and wetland for hikers, birdwatchers, gardeners and astronomers. Located at 3381 Hunting Country Road, Tryon. 859-9012 or www.fence.org.

GORGES STATE PARK: State park in Transylvania County, about 45 miles southwest of Asheville. Park office is on U.S. 64 in Sapphire. Trails, waterfalls, picnic areas, campsites. Admission is free. Call 966-9099.

 GRANDFATHER MOUNTAIN: Located off N.C. 221, south of Boone. Attractions include Mile High Swinging Bridge, environmental habitats for native wildlife, natural history museum and alpine hiking trails. Visit www.grandfather.com or call 800-468-7325.

 GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS NATIONAL PARK: Extends 70 miles along the North Carolina-Tennessee border. Hiking trails, scenic driving routes, camping, picnic sites. Open year-round. Free. Call the Oconaluftee Visitor Center on U.S. 441 at 497-1904 or visit www.nps.gov/grsm. 

Cataloochee Valley Tours: Operates hiking guide services and guided tours within the park, April-October. Tours provide an in-depth excursion with University of Florida Certified Master Naturalist, Esther Blakely, focusing on natural and cultural history and elk reintroduction. $35 per person. 450-7985. www.cataloocheevalleytours.com.

LAKE JAMES STATE PARK: At the base of Linville Gorge, Lake James State Park is a 6,510-acre lake with boating, fishing and swimming in season, picnic area, campground, hiking trails and ranger-led nature programs. Call office in Nebo, McDowell County, at 652-5047 or visit www.ncparks.gov.

LOST COVE NATURALIST CENTER: Offering programs in outdoor self-reliance living skills. Learn primitive technology skills, taught by hands-on professionals. Center is at 160 Grassy Knoll Way, Blowing Rock. More at 295-8570 or www.lostcovenaturalist.com.

MOUNTAIN WILD: Local chapter of the N.C. Wildlife Federation works to preserve and increase wildlife and wildlife habitat of the WNC mountains. Free programs meet the fourth Tuesday of each month at the WNC Nature Center, 75 Gashes Creek Road, Asheville. Call 338-0035.

(Page 12 of 13)

MOUNT MITCHELL STATE PARK: Home to the highest peak east of the Mississippi, Mount Mitchell, 6,684 feet elevation. Located on N.C. 128, off the Blue Ridge Parkway at Milepost 355. Interactive programs are free. Call 675-4611 or e-mail mount.mitchell@ncmail.net.

Wildlife, Weather and Trees of Mount Mitchell. Meet at 4:30 p.m. Oct. 23 at the Education Center.

Winter on Mount Mitchell. Meet at 10 a.m. Oct. 21 at the Education Center to learn what Mount Mitchell State Park is like in the winter and see short video.

Life of a Park Ranger. Meet at 10 a.m. Sunday at the Education Center to learn about ranger life at Mount Mitchell.

N.C. ARBORETUM: Connects people and plants through various year-round programs, lectures and special events. Promotes conservation, education and research. Located off N.C. 191/Brevard Road, south of the Biltmore Square Mall. Call 665-2492 or visit www.ncarboretum.org.

PISGAH CENTER FOR WILDLIFE EDUCATION: Ongoing calendar of classes at the center, adjacent to the fish hatchery in Pisgah National Forest near Brevard. Operated by N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission. All programs are free; registration required. The center is open to the public daily, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. except Sunday. Call 877-4423.

PURA VIDA ADVENTURES: Adventure guide service offering guided climbing, mountain biking, hiking, water tours and paddling trips. Call 772-579-0005 or visit www.pvadventures.com.

REI ASHEVILLE: Outdoors outfitter in Biltmore Park, 31 Schenck Parkway offers ongoing schedule of classes and special events. Call 687-0918 or visit www.rei.com. Registration required.

SIERRA CLUB (PISGAH): The Pisgah chapter of the national environmental club. Monthly meetings and discussions. Call Robert C. Hynett at 693-1975 or e-mail kodiac@cytechcis.net.

(Page 13 of 13)

SIERRA CLUB (WENOCA): Western North Carolina chapter of the Sierra Club. Meetings at Unitarian Church, corner of Charlotte Street and Edwin Place, Asheville, and are free and open to public. Visit www.northcarolina.sierraclub.org/wenoca.

SLICKROCK EXPEDITIONS: Cullowhee-based guide service that runs recreational trips of backpacking, canoeing and camping in wilderness areas throughout the Southeast, as well as in the Southwest and Pacific Northwest. Call Burt Kornegay at 293-3999 or visit www.slickrockexpeditions.com.

SOUTHERN APPALACHIAN HIGHLANDS CONSERVANCY: The conservancy works with individuals and local communities to identify, preserve and manage the region's important lands. Hikes scheduled on Saturdays. Call 253-0095 or visit www.appalachian.org.

RV CAMPING CLUB: Small local camping club looking for new members. Camping trips are one weekend per month, March-November. All ages welcome. No dues, no structured activities. We share a love of the outdoors, good company, great food & a roaring campfire. Contact Lillian at lilnau@aol.com or 369-6669.

WILD BIRDS UNLIMITED: Offering various bird programs with instructor and owner Simon Thompson. Visit www.asheville.wbu for directions, more information or contact WBU at 687-9433.

WNC NATURE CENTER: A living museum of plants and animals native to the Appalachian region, 75 Gashes Creek Road in East Asheville. Admission: $8 adults, $5 children, free to members of Friends of the Nature Center. Call 298-5600. www.wildwnc.org.

MOUNT MITCHELL STATE PARK: Home to the highest peak east of the Mi ssissippi, Mount Mitchell, 6,684 feet elevation. Located on N.C. 128, off the Blue Ridge Parkway at Milepost 355. Interactive programs are free. Call 675-4611 or e-mail mount.mitchell@ncmail.net.

Wildlife, Weather and Trees of Mount Mitchell. Meet at 4:30 p.m. Oct. 23 at the Education Center.

Winter on Mount Mitchell. Meet at 10 a.m. Oct. 21 at the Education Center to learn what Mount Mitchell State Park is like in the winter and see short video.

Life of a Park Ranger. Meet at 10 a.m. Sunday at the Education Center to learn about ranger life at Mount Mitchell.

N.C. ARBORETUM: Connects people and plants through various year-round programs, lectures and special events. Promotes conservation, education and research. Located off N.C. 191/Brevard Road, south of the Biltmore Square Mall. Call 665-2492 or visit www.ncarboretum.org.

PISGAH CENTER FOR WILDLIFE EDUCATION: Ongoing calendar of classes at the center, adjacent to the fish hatchery in Pisgah National Forest near Brevard. Operated by N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission. All programs are free; registration required. The center is open to the public daily, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. except Sunday. Call 877-4423.

PURA VIDA ADVENTURES: Adventure guide service offering guided climbing, mountain biking, hiking, water tours and paddling trips. Call 772-579-0005 or visit www.pvadventures.com.

REI ASHEVILLE: Outdoors outfitter in Biltmore Park, 31 Schenck Parkway offers ongoing schedule of classes and special events. Call 687-0918 or visit www.rei.com. Registration required.

SIERRA CLUB (PISGAH): The Pisgah chapter of the national environmental club. Monthly meetings and discussions. Call Robert C. Hynett at 693-1975 or e-mail kodiac@cytechcis.net

SIERRA CLUB (WENOCA): Western North Carolina chapter of the Sierra Club. Meetings at Unitarian Church, corner of Charlotte Street and Edwin Place, Asheville, and are free and open to public. Visit www.northcarolina.sierraclub.org/wenoca.

SLICKROCK EXPEDITIONS: Cullowhee-based guide service that runs recreational trips of backpacking, canoeing and camping in wilderness areas throughout the Southeast, as well as in the Southwest and Pacific Northwest. Call Burt Kornegay at 293-3999 or visit www.slickrockexpeditions.com.

SOUTHERN APPALACHIAN HIGHLANDS CONSERVANCY: The conservancy works with individuals and local communities to identify, preserve and manage the region's important lands. Hikes scheduled on Saturdays. Call 253-0095 or visit www.appalachian.org.

RV CAMPING CLUB: Small local camping club looking for new members. Camping trips are one weekend per month, March-November. All ages welcome. No dues, no structured activities. We share a love of the outdoors, good company, great food & a roaring campfire. Contact Lillian at lilnau@aol.com or 369-6669.

WILD BIRDS UNLIMITED: Offering various bird programs with instructor and owner Simon Thompson. Visit www.asheville.wbu for directions, more information or contact WBU at 687-9433.

WNC NATURE CENTER: A living museum of plants and animals native to the Appalachian region, 75 Gashes Creek Road in East Asheville. Admission: $8 adults, $5 children, free to members of Friends of the Nature Center. Call 298-5600. www.wildwnc.org.

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Asheville-area authors pick waterfalls, wildflowers tours

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News

10/20/2011 - Asheville-area authors pick waterfalls, wildflowers tours
by Karen Chavez - Asheville Citizen Times

 

 

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